A Step-by-Step Guide to Driving 10,000 Visitors a Month Through Pinterest

A Step-by-Step Guide to Driving 10,000 Visitors a Month Through Pinterest
by Neil Patel on October 9, 2015

pinterest

Social media can be a great traffic source for almost any online business.

But which network is right for you?

For most businesses, it makes sense to start with the largest networks. No matter how narrow your audience is, it’s very likely you’ll find members of that audience active on these networks.

This means that most businesses should start with one of the following:

Facebook
Pinterest
Twitter
LinkedIn

Although they are all huge, they are very different networks.

The best one for you will depend on your customers, your niche, and your marketing preferences.

Pinterest is the second biggest driver of referral traffic by a large margin.

image06

Despite that, it doesn’t get as much attention as Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.

This is mainly because it’s a unique network. Every single post on it is an image (with a short optional description).

Pinterest can be an amazing traffic source as long as you can create some sort of visual content in your niche.

And although it takes some time to learn how to use Pinterest effectively, it’s pretty simple once you understand it.

In this post, I’m going to show you how you can drive thousands of visitors a month to your website with Pinterest.
2 reasons why Pinterest is an amazing traffic source

The unique aspects of Pinterest are the reasons why Pinterest can be a great option for those businesses whose past social media marketing failed.

In particular, you need to understand two main reasons for using Pinterest to determine if it’s the right platform for you.

Reason #1 – Pins have great longevity: One of the problems with most social networks is that whatever you post stays visible only for a short period of time: anywhere from an hour to a few days at the most.

So even though you’re continually creating content on the network, you don’t benefit from it after you’ve initially posted it.

Seems like a waste, doesn’t it?

But Pinterest is different.

You can make a “pin” (share an image) that will continue to get views and shares over time.

It might not have the level of consistency that good search engine rankings have, but it’s much closer to achieving that kind of impact than any other social network.

If you’re active on Pinterest for a long time, the traffic will really add up.

For example, the food blog Pinch of Yum shared that they get about 500,000 visitors per month from Pinterest.

image20

Even if they stopped being active on the network, they would still get a large portion of that referral traffic for the foreseeable future.

Compare that to other networks, like Facebook and Twitter, where your traffic would take a nosedive shortly after you stop posting.

Reason #2 – Pinterest was designed for sharing: One of the reasons why pins live for so long is that users are always looking for more things to share.

This is what a typical Pinterest dashboard looks like when a user logs in:

image16

If a user likes a pin, they either “like” it or “repin” (share) it.

Good pictures can get hundreds or even thousands of repins.

Unlike other social networks, Pinterest isn’t about posting status updates about what happened during the day. It’s about sharing and consuming images and, by extension, content they link to.
Creating an account that attracts followers (3 key areas)

The first practical thing you need to know is how Pinterest works.

At first, it might seem a bit complex, but I promise that it’s fairly simple.

You start by creating an account, just like you would on any other social network.

When other users visit your profile, they’ll see something like this:

image01

Your profile is composed of 5 main areas:

Your logo – If your logo is very plain, you might want to create a custom image instead.
Your brand name – It should reflect your business, but you could also use a personal account with your name.
Your website URL
A description – A one- or two-line description that explains what you do.
Boards – These boards act as silos for the content you share on Pinterest (your pins are kept inside, depending on how you tag them). You should create a board for each category of images you plan to share (you can do this later).

Setting up your account: To start with, go to Pinterest, and sign up for a new account. You’ll want to select “continue as a business” on the first screen (after you enter your email):

image18

Then, fill out the fields as usual:

image13

If at any point you want to change your profile, you can do so by navigating to your profile and clicking “Edit Profile” in the top right corner:

image15

Using Pinterest is simple: Like I mentioned before, there is only one type of content on Pinterest – “pins.”

A pin always consists of an image. It also typically has a description, which can also include hashtags.

image19

It’s a good idea to include keywords in your description so that you show up when people use the search bar on Pinterest (which they do quite often).

As you can see in the pin above, you can either “pin it” to share it or you can “like it.”

Users see a variety of pins all at once as small versions. They can click on those to see their full versions.

image26

Users can find pins using the search bar or looking through their feed.

Their feed consists of pins that the users they are following have posted (more on this later).

And that’s really all there is to using Pinterest at a basic level.
How to drive insane referral traffic with pins

Because of how Pinterest is set up, driving traffic back to your website isn’t difficult.

Here’s the basic idea:

Pin attractive images from your blog content (or product pages)
Put URL of the blog post as the link
Get as many likes and repins on Pinterest as possible (more views)
Repeat steps 1-3 over and over again
Watch referral traffic grow exponentially

There’re obviously a few finer details in each of the steps, but that’s what the rest of this post covers.

Creating a pin the right way: The one part of using Pinterest that we haven’t covered yet is actually making a pin.

Depending on the popularity of your blog, you might find that your readers are already creating tons of pins for you.

You can check by going to:

http://www.pinterest.com/source/www.quicksprout.com

Replace “quicksprout” with your domain name.

On top of those pins, you’ll want to regularly make pins of your own to add to your boards.

Unlike with most networks, you can get away, for the most part, with posting only your own content, but it’s still a good idea to repin content from other Pinterest users as well.

To make your own pin, look at the top left of any of your boards. You’ll see a grey “add a pin” button in the top left.

Click it, and either upload a picture or enter a link to an image.

If you only put in a picture, your pin will look very plain, like this:

image10

If you click the pin (anywhere on the thumbnail), it will bring up the full pin.

Click on the “edit” button at the top of the pin:

image04

This will bring up a pop-up that allows you to edit the key information.

You can choose the board where the pin should live as well as enter a description plus the URL that it should point to:

image11

I know it may be tempting to link to a sales page, but always link to the most relevant to the image page. That’s what a Pinterest user is looking for if they click through to the URL.

After you’ve set the website address, users viewing your pin will have two different links that will point to that address:

image12

Now that you know how to create a pin, you need to learn one more important thing about them: how to pick images that users love to share.
4 types of images that Pinterest users love

I’m a huge fan of using beautiful images to produce better content.

The typical Internet user prefers to get information via a picture rather than a long passage of text.

People also process images about 60,000 times faster than words, which means that images are a more efficient way to communicate certain types of information as well.

In general, there are 4 types of images that get the most likes and pins on Pinterest. You can choose any one or combination of them when finding or creating images to share on Pinterest.

Type #1 – Beautiful background + clear text overlay: You’ve probably seen this type of picture often as the featured picture for a blog post.

The left pin in the picture below is an example of one:

image00

If you break the picture apart, it’s really simple to make.

First, you need a background image. Any high quality picture that’s vaguely related to your blog post will work, but remember that vertical pictures are best for Pinterest.

Then, you just need to put a slightly transparent box on top somewhere and add the title of your post.

I’ll admit that these types of pictures do look great, even if they’re simple to make.

If you’re not sure how to create this yourself, use my tutorial on creating your own custom images. I promise that you can make them in under 5 minutes once you learn how.

Ideally, create one for every single blog post you publish, and then pin it as well.

Type #2 – Infographics (or parts of them): Another type of image that you can use in many ways beyond Pinterest is infographics.

There’s no better way to summarize a lot of complex information in one image than an infographic.

A well-made infographic will drive traffic from Pinterest for years as it will continue to get repins and likes over time.

image25

On top of the standard type of infographic, step-by-step instructions are also popular on Pinterest.

Take a procedure to do something, and create an image for each step of the process:

image30

One big benefit of infographics on Pinterest beyond the fact that they are extremely shareable is that most users will click through to your site to see if there’s more background information on the image.

Here’s my guide to creating great infographics.

Type #3 – We all relate to other people: You’ll see a lot of well-made pictures in your feed.

One type of picture that always stands out from those is pictures of real people. Our eyes are naturally drawn to other people:

image03

If you’re not shy on camera, you can take pictures of yourself for certain blog posts and then pin those images.

Alternatively, you can just customize stock pictures of models—although original pictures are always best.

Type #4 – Custom images always stand out: In one of my early updates about the nutrition case study site, I noted that custom-drawn images were producing great results on Facebook.

These types of images do well on most social networks, but they do especially well on Pinterest.

Pinterest users appreciate images with lots of useful information, but they also appreciate a great design.

So something like this, despite just being a custom image for a blog post, can get repinned over 8,000 times:

image23

The downside of these images is that they’re going to cost more than the other types of images.

Unless you have the talent yourself, you’ll have to hire a freelancer from a site like Upwork. Depending on the quality you’re looking for, each image can cost anywhere from a few dollars to $100.
Get hundreds (or thousands) of followers with Pinterest contests

By now, you understand the basics of the network.

One key component of getting a lot of repins and likes is having a large following.

Your followers will see your pins in their home feed and will have the ability to repin them, which will show your pins to all of their followers (and so on).

If you have a really amazing picture, it can go viral even if you have a small following. But in most cases, it won’t happen.

If you have thousands of followers, I can virtually guarantee that you can get a few dozen of repins on any of your pins very quickly, which will expose your content to a new audience, leading to more views, repins, and followers.

In short: getting followers is important if you want to succeed on Pinterest.

I’m going to show you a few different strategies you can use to gain followers and get exposure for your content.

We’ll start with Pinterest contests.

The basic idea is to offer a prize for pinning something relevant to your brand, with the winner chosen at random. If the prize is great, the contest can spread to a wide audience, and you can pick up a lot of followers.

Unfortunately, these aren’t as effective as they used to be because Pinterest started to enforce some strict rules.

For example, you cannot ask users to follow you, repin, or share your images in order to get extra entries into the contest.

If you’re looking to get a lot of followers quickly, this is your best bet (but make the prize attractive).

Step #1 – Come up with a simple idea and prize: Ideally, the main details about the contest should be captured in an attractive image that you can pin.

image17

And although you can’t tell users to do certain things, you can link the image to the Rules page on your own website (which is a good idea).

A lot of the success of your contest will be based on the prize. It has to be something that your target audience would be willing to create an image, or repin one of your existing pins, for.

On top of the prize, you will need to give the contest participants a specific task to do to gain an entry into the contest.

A common one is to take a picture with your product and add a specific hashtag that you create.

Or you can ask them to follow you and repin a picture from one of your boards.

image29

Step #2 – Set up your landing page: It can be hard to quantify the value of a follower on Pinterest. Furthermore, we know that email subscribers are even more valuable.

So although you can use your contest to get new followers, you should also try to use it to get more email subscribers on your site.

When a Pinterest user clicks on your contest pin, it should take them to a landing page with the rules of the contest.

One of the rules could be that they must submit an email address in order to be contacted if they win.

image27

Even if they don’t win, you could still offer them a consolation prize, like a discount, to try to encourage a sale.

Important note on contests: A successful contest needs to be seen by a lot of people. There’s no sense giving away a thousand dollars or a product worth that much if only 20 people enter the contest.

This is why you should wait until you start getting regular repins and engagement on your pins naturally, before you launch a contest.

You can also promote your contest on other social media channels.

The more followers you already have, the more repins you will get, which will lead to exposure to your target audience that you want.

The other benefit of this is that a contest will help convert existing followers on Pinterest into email subscribers, which is a better channel for marketing.

So, how else can you get more followers? Here’s an option you can use if you are starting from scratch…
Have spare time? How to get thousands of followers naturally

Social media is all about connecting to other people and brands.

And although Pinterest is a fairly unique network, it’s no different in regards to this aspect.

In order to get people to follow you, you need to make some sort of connection with them.

It could be through commenting on their pins or sharing their pins, but the simplest and most scalable option is to follow other users.

When you follow another user, they get a notification. Most of the time, they will check out your profile.

If they like your profile and like the content you post on your boards (which is why it’s important to be active), they’ll follow you back.

Depending on how good your profile is and how well you pick the people you follow, 1-10% of them will follow you back.

But there are limits. In order to prevent spammers, Pinterest imposed limits on the number of people you can follow within an hour. It’s currently at 300 people per hour.

If you go over this limit, you’ll risk getting your account suspended or banned.

It takes about 5-15 minutes to follow this many people, and it will get you anywhere from 3 to 30 new followers.

Although that sounds like a lot of work, imagine if you did that just twice a day. Even with mediocre results, let’s say 10 new followers, you’d pick up 600 new followers in a month, and 7,200 in a year.

That’s a pretty large following.

If you also consider that your following will grow from getting repins and likes, you can multiply that total by 2, 3, or more.

Yes, you’ll have to be dedicated, but this simple math shows that this strategy can work.

A lot of your success will be determined by whom you follow. If you run an account about home decorating but follow football fans, you’ll get a terrible follow-back rate.

To avoid this, use the following two different methods to find users to follow who are actually interested in your content.

Finding people to follow – method #1 (keywords): Pinterest has a pretty good search function. Type in your niche into the search bar, and press enter (it will divide it into separate words automatically):

image09

This will bring up all pins relevant to those keywords.

Obviously, if someone pins or repins an image that is related to your keywords, they’re probably interested in the topic.

image14

Next, you’ll have to click on the name of the sharer (at the bottom of each pin) one by one.

That will bring you to the board to which they pinned the image. Click their name and image once again on that page (on the top left) in order to see their main profile:

image24

On their profile, click the “Follow” button on the top right in bright red:

image05

Alternatively, instead of clicking on the sharer’s name, you can click the image of the original pin and scroll down to the bottom.

Just past the comments, you’ll see a section that says “saved by [Pinterest user]”, which has the “Follow” button right beside it for you to click:

image28

This gets you some very targeted people to follow, but it is fairly time consuming. I’d recommend mixing this method with method #2.

Finding people to follow – method #2 (competitors): Instead of trying to find people who are probably interested in your niche, you can find people who are definitely interested in it.

How? By searching for your competitors.

For example, if I wanted to get more followers interested in social media marketing, I might search for “social media examiner” on Pinterest. If they have an account, it will come up in the suggestions bar under “pinners”:

image22

Click their name, and it will take you to their profile.

Assuming they are a strong competitor, they should have thousands of followers, which you can see at the top of their profile.

image21

Click the follower count in order to bring up a list of all their followers (from newest to oldest).

image02

The nice thing about this option is that there is a follow button under all of the followers.

You’ll likely see that some followers have zero or very few pins or followers themselves. Or they might not have a display picture (just a red thumbtack).

These aren’t active users, so don’t waste your follow limit on following them.

What about automation? I understand that this is a pretty tedious task. But it’s also a very effective way to build your follower list with very little cost.

If you do look around on Google, you’ll find tools that allow you to automatically follow people using the above methods. You can set the limits to make sure the tool doesn’t follow too many people in a short time period.

Here’s the thing: If you get caught, your account will be banned. Any hard work that went into it will be erased in a second.

Bots can do strange things sometimes, or you might set the limits just a bit too high and set off triggers that get you into trouble.

I do not recommend using bots to get followers, but if you do, always err on the side of caution.

The better option, if you don’t want to do this yourself, is to hire a foreign freelancer to do it for you (you can find one on Elance, for example).

Create a quick video of what you want them to do, how many people they should follow in an hour, and how many hours you’d like them to do it in a day.

I would only do this at the beginning since there is a risk in giving someone else access to the account.

Ultimately, it’s a boring task but something that you should do yourself. Find a way to clear 20 minutes a day to do it, and get it done.
Hint: Make this change on your blog posts to amplify their reach

We’ve covered a ton already—just about everything you need to know about using Pinterest effectively for your business:

how to create an account
how to pin and repin images
what kinds of images work best
how to get followers

And if you do all that, you can be successful on Pinterest.

But there’s one really easy way to get even more out of your pins.

Since you’ll be creating most of your images for your blog posts first and then pinning them on Pinterest, why not let your other blog readers do that as well?

You can use a WordPress plugin to automatically add a “Pin it” button to all of your blog images, which will show up any time someone hovers over them with their mouse.

image07

With the button, a reader can pin the image with just a few clicks.

Once you’ve installed the plugin, go to its settings to make sure everything is configured correctly:

image08

The most important setting is the “Show Pin It Button On Image Hover” option along with the color and size of the button.

You want to pick a color that makes it stand out from most of your images and website.

Getting extra pins from your blog readers will help increase the longevity of your pins even more.

Every time an old picture gets pinned again, it will be shown to the pinner’s followers as well as at the top of any relevant searches.
Conclusion

Pinterest is a unique social network with a lot of aspects that make it a great marketing channel.

If you follow the steps in this post and stay consistent with the process, I guarantee that you will be driving thousands of visits to your website every month with minimal effort at that point.

Once you start driving a solid amount of traffic, you can work on increasing your email opt-in rate and eventually turning those subscribers into customers.

I know that learning an entire social network marketing strategy in one post can be a little overwhelming, so leave me any questions you have in the comments below.
If you want to break through to real profits online, you need some serious firepower. For a limited time I’m sharing some select tips and tricks Amazon, Microsoft, NBC & Hewlett Packard paid thousands of dollars per hour for, FREE.

The step by step guide to monster traffic generation
The how-to guide for increasing conversions on your website
7 Cashflow killers your analytics tools are hiding from you

100% privacy, I will never spam you!
Comments

Petar
October 9, 2015 at 8:15 AM

Well, Pinterest has enormous potential to drive customers and sales for broad range of businesses. I have noticed several smart marketers drive tons of qualified traffic to their blogs/online stores. You have done quite good again, Neil. Very useful read!
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:49 AM

Petar, businesses that have figured out Pinterest do exceptionally well.

It’s definitely a tool for people to use when they have limited resources to blog or want to supplement their blogging.

Glad you found it helpful.
Reply
Arsalan
October 9, 2015 at 8:19 AM

Informative article.
I didn’t prefer pinterest as a huge traffic source. But now its looks like, it work much better than linkedin and twitter.
just I have to hit the right chord to make most out of it.
Thanks for this great tips.
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:49 AM

Arsalan, glad to help.

Once you dive into Pinterest you’ll realize there are a lot of applications.

Thanks for the feedback.
Reply
Al-Amin Kabir
October 9, 2015 at 8:19 AM

Thanks a lot for the detailed article, Neil.

As an Amazon affiliate marketer, I’m now solely depending on Google for my niche site traffic. But it’s really risky to put all the eggs on the same basket.

Who knows when mighty Google changes its’ mind!

I hope to increase my Amazon niche site traffic following your pinterest traffic blueprint! 🙂
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:53 AM

Al-Amin, glad you found it helpful.

You are absolutely right about diversifying your channels — having a mult-channel approach yields the best results.

Keep me posted on progress and let me know how it goes.
Reply
Mani
October 9, 2015 at 8:20 AM

I’ve been using Pinterest to pin my tech site’s post, even though i rarely visit the site , i’ve been getting atleast two or three pins for my new posts to old posts = visitors to my site.

What i came to know from this post, i don’t want to miss 1000’s of visitors , gonna create my niche specific boards and start earning followers .

Thanks Neil 🙂
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:55 AM

Mani, that’s great — sounds like you’ve found a pocket within your niche that uses Pinterest.

Let me know how it goes and keep me posted on progress!
Reply
Manpreet Singh
October 9, 2015 at 8:21 AM

WOW! Neil,

This is such an informational article. I have tried using Pinterest as a traffic source but it didn’t worked out.

Now I am going to use these strategies (specially the concept of following others to get followers) and see how it goes.

Thanks for sharing these helpful tips 🙂
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:55 AM

Manpreet, glad you found the post helpful.

Reciprocity is key when it comes to social media. You have to give to get. Good luck!
Reply
Sanjay Shenoy
October 9, 2015 at 8:25 AM

This post has come at a perfect time. One more thing you might want to add along with these tips is the large community boards. These can send in massive amounts of traffic considering how good your pin is. Usually I target boards that have atleast 50k followers. Once inside you need to build your rep with attractive pins and then subtly slip in your pins. Thanks again Neil!
Reply
L.L. Barkat
October 9, 2015 at 8:34 AM

Any particular way you find these boards, Sanjay?
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:56 AM

Sanjay, thanks for sharing that great strategy — something I definitely could have gone into more in-depth in the post.

Please provide some more insights per L.L.’s request 🙂
Reply
Shaheryar
October 9, 2015 at 8:30 AM

Nice Explanation Neil. Gotta try this myself, let’s see how much traffic I can generate for my site 🙂
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:56 AM

I am sure you’ll be able to generate a lot once you figure out the specific strategy for your audience.
Reply
L.L. Barkat
October 9, 2015 at 8:32 AM

Pinterest has never been a big driver for us. (What’s a baseline following for making it a good driver?)

But it was cool to go see what’s been posted on our behalf (thanks for that idea 🙂 ). Looking at the board names is a quick-and-easy keyword research exercise!
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:57 AM

L.L. it’s not for everyone. However, there are a lot of brands that think it’s not for them and don’t even try — that’s a big no no. You have to see what channels work for you.
Reply
Hamza
October 9, 2015 at 8:35 AM

Great tips Neil! Loved the idea of running a contest to get followers. I also have been using the Follow People method in the past for some of my Pinterest pages. And it did secured me around 400 niche related followers in a week or so. Though, I’ve got to admit; it’s a pain to get followers that way!

Please keep sharing stuff like this.
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:58 AM

Hamza, glad you found the tips helpful.

The follow method is strategically sound and has worked great for a number of brands I have consulting in the past.

Hard work pays off 😉
Reply
Zainab Malik
October 9, 2015 at 8:37 AM

I was wondering that how people can get some much traffic from the pinterest Your post is really very helpful Neil 🙂
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:58 AM

Zainab, glad you found it helpful.

Let me know if you need any specific help with Pinterest. Always love teaching and learning more from readers.
Reply
Greg Strandberg
October 9, 2015 at 8:44 AM

Great ideas. I love the detailed screenshots. Maybe this will get a lot of people off the couch and onto Pinterest – I know many of us have thought or talked about it, but haven’t made the plunge.

I think it’s important to remember how much Pinterest can help out old posts. Maybe a post that you wrote a year ago is getting 100 hits a month. If it has relevant images that appeal to your niche, Pinterest could boost that to 200 hits a month or more.

That can really increase a site’s advertising revenue or conversions. Take that time 10 posts or more and you’ll have some serious results on your hands…at least that’s the idea.
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 9:59 AM

Greg, glad you liked them.

It’s important to find what works for your audience. As you mentioned it’s important to mine through old posts and find actionable data to work from.

Thanks for sharing and I look forward to hearing much more from you.
Reply
Azizul Yusof
October 9, 2015 at 8:45 AM

Thanks for the detailed Guide Neil.
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 10:00 AM

Azizul, glad you liked it — I look forward to hearing more from you.
Reply
Drazen Prastalo
October 9, 2015 at 8:52 AM

What a timing Neil, I am just about to publish an article about Pinterest and how to get thousands of visits from it.

Great article btw, I’m glad people are starting to see the real power of Pinterest and that it’s not just some social platform for women.
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 10:03 AM

Drazen, glad we could connect at the right time.

I am sure that article will do well as a ton of people are interested in knowing how to grow their audience. Let me know if you need any help along the way.
Reply
Kamlesh
October 9, 2015 at 9:12 AM

This is something great i found out here. In depth guide to drive great traffic from Pinterest. I am using it but just found the right way to do it. Search function that you mentioned is really a awesome feature by pinterest that i was unaware of using.
Thanks for the great post.
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 10:04 AM

Kamlesh, glad the article was helpful.

The search function is a great way to find some great content. People on Pinterest are overly concerned with quality — which is great!

Looking forward to hearing much more from you.
Reply
Rohit Sharma
October 9, 2015 at 9:19 AM

Hey Neil,

Pinterest is indeed one of the best sources to drive referral traffic to a blog. When it comes to referral traffic, people usually think of driving traffic from sites like Reddit, Twitter and Facebook but the truth is if one publishes one’s content with appealing images then Pinterest can turn out to be one of the best sources of referral traffic.

Nonetheless, another informative and helpful post written by you for your readers. Have a nice weekend ahead, Neil. Cheers!

– Rohit
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 10:06 AM

Rohit, Pinterest is all about quality. Low quality images and products on Pinterest get weeded out pretty quickly — so great points.

If you provide value you’ll get it back and that’s the whole concept underlying how Pinterest works. Looking forward to hearing more from you.
Reply
Mayank
October 9, 2015 at 9:21 AM

Hey Neil,

Great post! This post really cleared everything about Pinterest and seems like a way on how to get started on Pinterest. The 10% will follow back thing was also nice and 600 followers a month will really be enticing but will it really happen? Cause I really got excited on that part.

Thanks,
Mayank
Reply
Neil Patel
October 9, 2015 at 10:07 AM

Mayank, glad you liked the post.

I have found that 10% is a pretty solid number across channels. I have seen similar results with Twitter. Try it out 😉
Reply
Isaac
October 9, 2015 at 10:14 AM

Following targeted people works fine for getting new followers, but Pinterest doesn’t have an easy to way unfollow people who don’t follow you back.
Reply
John
October 9, 2015 at 10:18 AM

Missed Group Boards, HUGE way to grow and reach large audiences. 🙂
Reply
Charles
October 9, 2015 at 11:01 AM

What an interesting and detailed post about Pinterest. I had ignored Pinterest, but now I see I was probably missing the boat.

Thanks. Keep up the good work!
Reply
Derek
October 9, 2015 at 11:36 AM

Great tips. One thing I would love to see included in this article is leveraging group boards and how to get invited into popular boards with high re-pin rates. Also great tool for automation I use is boardbooster!
Reply
Justin Ver Burg
October 9, 2015 at 11:40 AM

Neil, You’re very thorough in your research and I believe this content is solid enough that you could charge $295 just for the info here! Thanks for the info.

BTW, it might be worth mentioning that Pinterest accounts for high dollar amounts in sales transactions – even though it is so small compared with some of the giants (Facebook, etc.) – because people with high buying power (women with high disposable income – who make 90-98% of household buying decisions) are there to actually shop (instead of socialize).

Again, THANKS again for these findings. AWESOME!
Reply
gordon
October 9, 2015 at 11:45 AM

Another Great Article, Neil.

Are you soon going to post the results from September for the 100k challenge?
Reply
vinay
October 9, 2015 at 12:20 PM

Great one Neil and Also that Attracting Followers and Tips to gain followers are nice and well judged. Thanks for the post
Reply
Kevin Love
October 9, 2015 at 12:58 PM

Great overview on all aspects of Pinterest, Neil.

I’ve been using Pinterest to get ideas for t-shirt designs, but I haven’t used it as a traffic source yet. I’ll definitely get that going. Thanks for laying out a clear plan for doing so!
Reply
SEO Bibek
October 9, 2015 at 1:52 PM

Though I had already created and connected Pinterest with my website, I was wondering how it would really work and had almost made the account dormant.
This post is surely helpful. I hope, following each steps in the guide will surely generate some traffics for me.
Reply
Michael Kawula
October 9, 2015 at 3:04 PM

Awesome tips. I’ve found Pinterest though not in my top 5 traffic sources to be in my top 3 for time on site. Average visitor is spending so much more time it’s crazy. Love the following strategy.
Reply
Zbynek
October 9, 2015 at 4:26 PM

Actually the results of Pinterest vary a lot. I have hundreds of pictures there and the referrals can be counted on finger monthly! This is because of quite bitchy way Pinterest works – you have to click full res image and then click again on the picture to visit the source. Of course, only few ppl do that. So it is a good idea to put link into the description itself.

Then there is the nature of pictures – you need vertical pictures and in best case infographics. These work very well.

Btw. FB is my best traffic source, followed by Reddit. But compared to the number of published links, Reddit is by far the best traffic source and doesnt nosedive like FB or TW. Sometimes even hundred links on FB are not as powerful as one good link on Reddit. TW is extremely poor, lot of followers but no traffic, just retweets and likes.
Reply
Delwar Jahan
October 9, 2015 at 6:26 PM

Pinterest is kind of amazing to me always. I started sharing on pinterest years ago and I am getting a decent amount of uncharted traffic from there. I can’t always be sure I will get them but the sudden referrals from pinterest appears helpful.

I have a site on entertainment niche and people love those photos and memes :). Great explanation here by you. Gracious.
Reply
krishna kant
October 9, 2015 at 9:01 PM

wow ! great post, before yesterday i pin 1 or 2 image but i learn now how effective is pinterest and how it drive traffic to my website. i am working on an ecommerce website and this post helps to me.
can you suggest me a post which can drive more traffic to my ecommece website.

and keep it up. you helps thousands people……..thank you
Reply
Rajkaran Singh
October 9, 2015 at 9:42 PM

Hi Neil
This is quite an exciting stuff. I opened account on Pinterest but then ignored it as I could not figure out how to use this. But now I am quite hopeful and shall take this seriously. Thanks for sharing.
Reply
Syed Moeen Uddin
October 9, 2015 at 10:05 PM

Assalm O Alikum Neil,

I am really convinced with this information. as far i have researched on pinterest has shown remarkable result for Niche sites. if you are doing a business in a real way and want visitors particularly from Western territory, then pinterest is the Hub of Western traffic.
Reply
Ken Stone
October 9, 2015 at 11:12 PM

Hey Neil,

This was probably one of the best marketing blog posts I’ve ever read.

You are right up there with Ryan Deiss in my opinion… SUPER QUALITY STUFF!!!
Reply
Abhishek
October 9, 2015 at 11:54 PM

Nice post Neil Patel,
I also believe that pins have great longevity. Your post is very informative and worth reading and helped me in improving my knowledge about how to increase traffic from social media sites.
Reply
Godlove
October 10, 2015 at 12:40 AM

I have been very active on pinterest lately.

This has just added some fresh information.
Reply
Jacqueline Schaalje
October 10, 2015 at 1:15 AM

Thanks for the very helpful post!
I had followed your strategy from a previous post of pinning on community boards and just pin a lot. But following other pinners works better.
I started yesterday and already have a lot more followers. In a few days I guess I will have a better view about the growth rate.
By the way, about what you said about the limit that Pinterest imposes on how many pinners you can follow per hour, I got a very polite popup message that I had exhausted my option to follow people: it had been blocked due to a fear of spam. 🙂 It was before the 300. I had clicked on 280 pinners.
Reply
Swapan
October 10, 2015 at 1:30 AM

This is a great post on Pinterest marketing key techniques using strategic tips. I did the same topic relevant to you, but I missed some points do find here in your resourceful article. In my view point, Pinterest is a sustainable source for quality traffic for the marketers or bloggers who could generate pin-worthy image relevant to their blogs. Thanks for the precious share.
Reply
Naresh
October 10, 2015 at 1:58 AM

Neil, the Pinterest guide you suggested sounds great. Never thought of using Pinterest seriously. This post is very timely for me! I like the idea one which “GET THOUSANDS OF FOLLOWERS NATURALLY”. These tips are great and set a goal of 100 followers by the end of this month and started working that way.

Thanks for sharing these. I appreciate the step-by-step guidance.
Reply
Bilal
October 10, 2015 at 2:45 AM

I am also working on social media but after reading your article i have awesome ideas to manage my Pinterest very easily because you have described it very nicely with complete explanations. Thanks keep it up and guide us to good path.
Reply
Ryan percy
October 10, 2015 at 3:11 AM

Neil, I have one small doubt. Does the traffic we’re getting from Pinterest can be get converted to leads or sales? As these users are not pre-qualified users, so is it worth to spend too much time for working on the strategy of generating huge traffic from Pinterest?
Reply
jeff the blogster
October 10, 2015 at 3:19 AM

Dude this is just what i was waiting for… gonna get my profile a bit optimized now..that you mention it..

Thanks for this useful post

Jj from http://www.start-a-website.info
Reply
Soumik Ghosh
October 10, 2015 at 3:32 AM

Rightly said.But it takes a bit more time to actually get the results.Neil if I want to use Pinterest ads from India is it available to me now?Currently I seem they put us on waiting list.
Reply
ENFP Elias
October 10, 2015 at 4:27 AM

I’m not kidding when I said that this post is something I’ve been looking for for two weeks now.

Working to launch something and I just know that I needed to get very acquainted with Pinterest, since it’s a place where I imagine my IC hangs out a lot.

Thank you so much for this!
Reply
Oussama
October 10, 2015 at 6:35 AM

Thank you a lot Neil! I was looking for a step-by-step guide for Pinterest from a long time already. I usually find only some good contents but that doesn’t cover all the points the same way you do it. Thank you a lot!
You already made a great explanation for how to leverage and use wisely Facebook, Linkedin, StumbleUpon, Instagram and now Pinterest. I am really looking forward to the step-by-step guide for Twitter. He is the third one in the graph that you shared at the beginning of this post, so I think it deserves a guide too.

Keep doing the great work Neil, you are amazing! I wish you a lot of luck!
Reply
Jack
October 10, 2015 at 6:41 AM

Hi Neil,
The great post as your other posts are.
I’m no active poster, but I always read your articles/posts because you’re riding the tide.
Could you please advise me how many boards/pins I may submit before I’ll start looking for followers?
I sell X-mas ornaments and different collectibles. No big business really. I thought probable pinterest would work better than FB for me.
Thank you.
Reply
Bill
October 10, 2015 at 7:31 AM

My wife has a personal Pinterest account and one of the boards is pretty popular. Which brings me to my question: What about small or accidental businesses, should I create a whole new Pinterest account for that popular board and split it off from her personal Pinterest account to a separate account?

This is probably an age-old question but I hate the thought of managing two accounts. Not making too much money off the accidental business so we really can’t afford to have someone else manage it. We work during the day at “normal” jobs and she does her Pinterest thing at night. Any thoughts? Thanks. Great article/ideas by the way.
Reply

Speak Your Mind

Name *

Email *

Website

Free Course: “Double Your Traffic
in 30 Days” + Secret Bonus
(Valued at $300)
ProductThis amazing course will teach you, step by step, how to double if not triple your traffic over the next 30 days.

Fill out the form below to
start your FREE Course

Email

100% Privacy. I will never spam you!
About Neil Patel

Neil Patel is the co-founder of Crazy Egg and Hello Bar. He helps companies like Amazon, NBC, GM, HP and Viacom grow their revenue. The Wall Street Journal calls him a top influencer on the web, Forbes says he is one of the top 10 online marketers, and Entrepreneur Magazine says he created one of the 100 most brilliant companies in the world. He was recognized as a top 100 entrepreneur under the age of 30 by President Obama and one of the top 100 entrepreneurs under the age of 35 by the United Nations. Neil has also been awarded Congressional Recognition from the United States House of Representatives. Continue reading

Guides
Current Hits
All Time

The Beginner’s Guide to Online Marketing
The Advanced Guide to SEO
The Advanced Guide to Content Marketing
The Advanced Guide to Link Building
The Complete Guide to Building Your Blog Audience
The Definitive Guide to Growth Hacking
The Definitive Guide to Conversion Optimization
The Definitive Guide to Landing Page Optimization
The Definitive Guide to Marketing Automation
The Definitive Guide to Copywriting
The Complete Guide to Understanding Consumer Psychology
The Complete Guide to Building Your Personal Brand

Search
Hire me to speak

I speak at over 25 conferences per year on entrepreneurship and Internet marketing. Before you hire me, there are a few things you need to know. Click here to find out what they are.
Subscribe

Even if you don’t visit my site on a regular basis, you can get the latest posts delivered to you for free via RSS or Email:
or

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s